Category Archives for "Management"

1 A new approach to website design BNBranding

Getting to the point for better PowerPoint Presentations

BNBranding logoEvery year at the Mac Expo, Steve Jobs used to unveil some fantastic new, game-changing technology from Apple. His presentations were always outstanding, both for the content and for entertainment value.

macbook_air_introFor instance, when he introduced the MacBook air back in 2009, he didn’t just talk about the specs of the new product, he demonstrated its thinness by pulling thin new laptop out of a 9×12 manilla envelope.

That’s great showmanship. And salesmanship.

It wasn’t just passion and natural charisma that made Jobs an effective communicator. It was his ability to convey ideas in simple, concise ways. He used honest demonstrations. Stories. Theater. And yes, some Hollywood special effects.

Not Powerpoint. PowerPoint is the antithesis Apple, the enemy of innovation and the world’s biggest communication crutch.

 

 

If you really want better Powerpoint presentations, just go without it!

Some time ago I attended a two-day branding conference down in Austin, Texas. The keynote speaker was a wise old pro who speaks and teaches professionally all across the country. He had an assistant with him, as well as tech support from the conference facility staff.

It was a disaster. Three hours into it and he was still fumbling around with his computer…

Lights on. Lights off.

Sound’s way too loud. Sound’s not on. Sound’s out of sync.

Slides are out of order. Video won’t play. How many times do we have to look at this guy’s desktop?

For him, a better Powerpoint Presentation would have meant no computer at all.

But to be fair, even if the computer had behaved itself his Powerpoint Presentation still would have fallen flat. Because his ideas were totally scattered. His slides were loaded with text that he read verbatim. And his speech wasn’t really a speech at all.

Thank God, I’m not a middle manager in a big corporation where I’d have to endure daily doses of that crap. Powerpoint, as it’s commonly employed, is a terrible form of communication.

In “The Perfect Pitch,” Jon Steele says, “most presenters start with the slides, and then treat what they are going to say simply as an exercise in linkage. The unfortunate consequence of this is that the presenter is reduced to a supporting role. To all presenters, I say this: YOU are the presentation.”

That’s easy to say if you’re as big as Steve Jobs. But you don’t have to be famous to put on a gripping and persuasive Powerpoint presentation. You just have to change the process and forget about Powerpoint until you’re three-quarters of the way through.

If you want to deliver better powerpoint presentations, think of yourself as a storyteller, not a presenter.

better powerpoint presentations from BNBrandingI’m talking about the old-fashioned, verbal tradition of story telling. Stories are way more compelling than slides. No matter how boring the topic may seem, there’s always a story buried in there somewhere.

So tell the story. Write it down. Flesh it out and practice it before you ever open Powerpoint.

Here’s another way to look at: Concentrate first on how you sound and what you say, then use the software to create visual support for your main verbal points. Not the other way around.

You’ll be amazed how focused your message becomes.

The first rule of communicating is to eliminate confusion.

Make things clear! When you throw a bunch of data up on a slide, you’re not making things more clear, you’re just adding confusion.

AED1345115281_463_work_work_head_image_eepv1aBack in the day, before PowerPoint was ever conceived, corporate presentations were done with slide projectors. You had to send out for slides, way ahead of time!

So you were forced to think long and hard about the design and content of each and every slide.

You had to plan the flow of the presentation. You had to know the most important points and you were forced to boil it down until there was absolutely nothing else left. Then you’d cover the rest of the detials in your speech.

We were forced to be good speakers.

Powerpoint makes it too easy to add slides and overwhelm people with charts and graphs. The technological tool has become a crutch that hobbles great communication. Got an idea? Just jump right into PowerPoint and start creating slides.

Another unfortunate side effect of PowerPoint is lousy, truncated speaking. People think they have to limit their words to fit the slides. And what they. End up with. Is choppy. Confusing. Information. That doesn’t. Flow. Or Communicate. Much of anything.

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If you write the script first and then use PowerPoint slides as visual aids to drive home the main points, you won’t have that problem. You’ll be speaking from a coherent, human, story-based script, not reading random bullet points right off the slides.

The difference is dramatic.

I suspect that much of the problem stems from the fear of public speaking. And that’s understandable. People with that fear like to hide behind the PowerPoint slides. They can become almost invisible.  But that’s not how you’re going to make a sale, further your career or build a successful business. You have to suck it up, and put yourself out there.

Truth is, if you want to improve your presentations you’re going to have to get comfortable with public speaking.

Join Toastmasters. Watch some YouTube videos and see how the pros do it. Find a good mentor… Salespeople are usually the best at it, so if there’s someone really good at your company offer to be an audience as they practice. Watch, listen, and learn. And forget about mastering all the technical bells and whistles of PowerPoint. That will just distract you from the main objective.

So here’s the final word for better Powerpoint presentations:

If you want people to remember your words, translate them into a picture. Put the picture up on the screen, then speak the words.

Don’t put the written words up there, just to be repeated from your trembling lips. It’s redundant. It’s boring. And it’s unimaginative. Words up on the screen do not make great visual aids.

Steve Jobs didn’t put the words “thinest laptop on the market” up on the screen. He showed us. He demonstrated how thin it was while he talked about the details.

That’s how it’s supposed to be done.

If you need help writing better Powerpoint presentations, give me a call at BNBranding. 541-815-0075.
If you want more on how to be more clear and concise in all your marketing communications, try this post.

 

hire the right marketing person BN Branding

How to hire the right marketing person — the first time.

BNBranding logoHere’s a recruiting problem that I see quite frequently: A lot of business owners don’t know how to hire the right marketing person. I’ve seen many good, stable companies churn through dozens of marketing people before they find a match.

hire the right marketing person BN Branding

The revolving door gets costly.

The clients I work with rely on small, efficient teams for all their marketing needs. So sometimes, the best marketing advice I can offer is how to hire the right marketing person.

It’s not easy, and the answer varies dramatically depending on the skills and interests of the CEO or owner.

But one thing’s for sure… If you have a fledgling start-up, you better think carefully about the type of person you hire to spearhead your marketing efforts.

And if you’ve been through several marketing people in a short period of time, read on…

 

 

The most common mistake is hiring a marketing specialist to do it all… someone who’s deep into SEO, or social media, or web development, or graphic design or whatever.

Those “doers” are all important team players in your marketing mix, but what you need is a thinker/doer to lead the way. Unless you’re a marketing generalist yourself, you’ll need an idea person who can wear many different hats.

According to the Harvard Business Review, “top marketing talent must be able to combine skills that don’t often go together, and might even seem contradictory…  Analytical + Creative. Innovation + Execution. Storytelling + sales skills.”

You won’t find that combination of skill sets in a specialist.

hire the right marketing person the first time BN BrandingIn this age of marketing specialization, you need a generalist… someone who nimble enough to take the podium and speak for you one minute, and then jump in and get work done the next.

Here are three good tips on how to hire the right marketing person:

1.  Broad experience means better perspective.

The marketing game is changing quickly these days, and there are a lot of moving parts. You need someone with enough perspective and experience to understand the entire playing field and keep all the balls in the air.

If you hire a specialist you’ll get a myopic view of marketing and branding. If she only has experience in social media, she’ll assess your entire branding effort and come up with many creative ways to use social channels.

It’s like the old saying… if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

Recently I sat in on a presentation by a young man pitching his social media expertise to a non-profit organization. With no research, no understanding of the brand or the business model, and no experience to speak of, he was absolutely convinced that the organization ­­should replace every other marketing tactic with social media advertising.

That’s not the kind of thinking that will take your business to the next level.

2. Specialists don’t know strategy. 

Specialists often talk “strategy.” One will offer an email marketing strategy, another candidate will bring a social media strategy, a digital strategy, a direct response strategy, a Facebook strategy, an SEO strategy and even a SnapChat strategy.

hiring the right marketing person Brand Insight BlogIf you’re not careful you’ll be swimming in “strategies.”

Don’t be fooled. There’s only one strategy. Everything else is just a to-do list.

British adman Simon Pont puts it quite well: “One strategy, one collective intent; many expressions and executions, all with moving parts and all aligned. It’s all about linking into that one given strategy and expressing it through many specialties.”

You can always hire outside help on a project-by-project basis to execute specific tactics and get through that tactical to-do list. What you can’t find so easily is someone who can think strategically and come up with ideas that actually do qualify as a true marketing strategy.

“A strategy is an idea… a conceptualization of how a goal could be achieved.”

Emphasis on IDEA! Successful marketing strategies are rooted in big ideas. Not punch lists.

For a big idea you need someone with creative skills, uncommon business sense and a good working knowledge of all the different marketing specialties.

In a perfect world you’d find an experienced, well-rounded marketing pro who brings advertising planning experience as well as creative skills to the table… a one man marketing machine who could to analyze market research data one day, extrapolate that one little nugget of consumer insight you need, and write a brilliant ad the next.

That’s a rare breed. If you find someone like that, pay him or her handsomely. Give them tons of freedom and let them in on every crucial management decision. I guarantee you, your company will be better off for it. If you can’t find that person, call me.

3. Effective managers know something about what they’re managing.

If you hire a manager who knows nothing about computer programming, he’s going to have a very hard time managing a team of computer programmers. Some fundamental knowledge of the material is necessary.

Same holds true in marketing.

Most specialists simply don’t have the fundamental knowledge of the material they need to manage the whole effort efficiently.

For example… If you hire a social media specialist to drive your entire marketing effort, she’s going to struggle when it comes to managing traditional advertising, content marketing, direct response TV, or any other tactics.

Don’t expect that person to suddenly be capable of doing anything beyond her specialty. That’s just not realistic. Marketing is important, and you could lose a lot of money waiting for your marketing leader to “grow into the position.”

Instead, hire a generalist who’s already there. Then let that generalist hire a specialist to do her specialty thing. Don’t hire a specialist to manage other specialists. It doesn’t work.

Look, hiring right is very hard. I know that. (That’s why I’m a firm believer in hiring HR specialists to handle the initial screening and recruitment and help with the interviewing.)

Hopefully this piece will help you avoid costly trial and error when hiring a marketing person. And maybe a great, well-rounded marketing generalist will find the perfect position that will lead to fame and fortune. In either case, it helps to have a strategic branding company on your side, as well.

BNBranding's Brand Insight Blog

 

 

 

About the author…

John Furgurson is one of those valuable generalists. He cut his teeth in the direct response advertising and has done corporate film, advertising of all kinds, content marketing, PR, social media and just about every other specialty under the big branding umbrella. So if you’re still wondering how to hire the right marketing person, hire him to lead your marketing team, and then just add a couple specialists in supporting roles. 

1 How to survive when the economy tanks.

 There’s a lot of economic doom and gloom in the news these days; Unless you’re living in a cave somewhere, you’ve heard about the housing market, the unemployment rate and the rising price of groceries and gas.

For many business owners, it’s frightening. The fortune-teller economists are predicting even more “belt tightening” as the year goes on, and if you let it, all the crummy forecasts might scare you into doing something totally rash. Like nothing at all.

It’s pretty common, actually. When the leading economic indicators start heading south, many business owners go into immediate survival mode. Stop, drop and roll! Duck and cover!

The natural tendency is to adopt a siege mentality and hunker down until “things get better.” So they pull the plug on marketing and branding. Then P.R and charitable giving. Then training and customer service initiatives. They stop doing the things that helped them succeed in the first place.

It’s a strategy of inaction, and it never works. Not in the long run.

Studies of life and death survival struggles prove that action is the antidote for despair. You see it in cancer patients, in soldiers, castaways, mountaineers and disaster victims. Those who let despair take over, sit down and die. Survivors, on the other hand, take action.

Determination and a disciplined, almost clinical approach seem to be the secret. Survivors don’t place blame, make excuses or wallow in self pity. They accept their current circumstances and start working on a solution immediately by setting small, achievable goals. They don’t waste a lot of energy running around in circles, doing things that won’t get them to the goal.

For a climber in the Andes, it meant extricating himself from a crevasse and literally dragging his starving body and shattered leg 10 miles down a glacier. All the way back to camp. For one hiker in the canyonlands of Utah, it meant amputating his own arm with his pocket knife.

Makes surviving a recession seem like a cake walk.

Make no mistake about it, a significant economic downturn can be fatal to a small business. But businesses fail all the time, regardless of what the economy is doing.

The fact is, if you have a clearly defined strategy, and the discipline to stick with it, there’s no reason you can’t do much more than just survive a recession. You can thrive. You can gain ground on the competition. You launch new products and improve your entire operation. The history of American commerce if full of war stories that prove the point.

Post and Kellog’s were battling head-to-head in the breakfast cereal category when the Great Depression hit. W.C. Kellogg plowed ahead, doubled his advertising budget and even introduced the world’s first vitamin-enriched product cereal. Post cut back and Kellogg’s has been the market leader ever since. (Kellogg also cut hours in his plant for three of his shifts and added a fourth, just to spread his payroll among more workers. But that’s another story.)

But forget about the 1930’s. Here are some things you can do, right now, to survive the perfect, economic storm.

1. Use downtime to your advantage. Most managers have so many fires to put out they never get around to long-term strategic thinking. If things are slow, do it! Clarify your objectives and fine-tune your elevator pitch. Revisit your value proposition. Make sure you can communicate your strategy clearly and succinctly. (Few CEOs can.)

2. Get your bearings and refocus your efforts. In the woods, the last thing you want to do is wander around in circles. Same thing in business. Don’t waste precious energy and money chasing business that doesn’t really fit your model. (see item #1)

3. Renegoiate your media contracts. When it comes to print ad space and broadcast spots, you should be able to get a lot more for your money right now. So play hardball. Insist that your advertising salespeople work up innovative new schedules.

4. Get creative. Brainstorm new strategic alliances, sponsorship opportunities or marketing initiatives. Look for ways to leverage your existing partnerships. Do something! And keep this in mind: When times are tough even small initiatives can have a big impact. Because everyone else is sitting around waiting for the rescue helicopters.

5. Recycle one of your favorite, old ad campaigns. A lot of people kill campaigns way too soon, before the public has ever been thoroughly exposed to the messages. So instead of creating a whole new campaign, go through your archives and dust off the advertising that’s worked for you in the past.

6. Spend a little extra time listening to your best customers. Forget about you, and find out what their problems are. Then help devise a solution.

7. Take extra care of your people. They’re reading all the bad news in the paper too, and it’s unsettling. So step up, and be a leader. As the CEO, you have to be an optimist. Because nobody follows a pessimist.

 

 

 

 

 

2

Judge Not. (And make good marketing decisions.)

BNBranding logoMarketing is a very judgmental business. Business owners, CMOs and marketing managers are constantly judging their marketing efforts, and it’s almost always on subjective terms. Only a tiny portion of their overall branding efforts can ever be judged objectively, so it’s no surprise that so many people fail to make good marketing decisions.

make good marketing decisionsAd agencies and design firms judge each other in a constant battle of “my work’s cooler than your work.” They also subject themselves to judging in award shows, where a few peers get to judge the work of hundreds of competitors on an entirely subjective basis.

When it comes to television advertising, everyone’s a critic.

TV viewers sit around and judge the advertising they see, based on entertainment value alone. If it’s entertaining enough, they might talk about it over the water cooler. If not, they vote with the remote.

But playing armchair critic is less harmful than being judgmental in a business leadership role.

Critical thinking is tremendously important in marketing. If we didn’t look at things critically, we’d never push ourselves to come up with fresh, new ideas. Critical thinking is a key to good judgement.

You can be critical of someone’s ideas without judging the person. That’s constructive criticism. But there’s no such thing as being constructively judgmental.

 

 

 

For example, “That’s the worst commercial he’s ever done,” is being critical. “That director’s an idiot for making that commercial” is being judgmental. Judgmental of who he is, versus critical of what he does.

Being judgmental has negative, disapproving connotations. It’s based on intolerance, stereotypes and prejudice.

get noticed by making good marketing decisions BN BrandingI’ve seen a lot of sensible, savvy business owners and high-level managers make hair-brained decisions because they were too judgmental. One client I know believes that all advertising people are evil con-men, preying on well-meaning business owners. Once burned, he lets his past experience cloud his judgement to the point of being obstinately ineffective.

His poor judgement in that one area puts his leadership in question and hurts the morale of his entire team.

Good judgement, on the other hand, is the ability to form sound opinions and make sensible decisions, even if a lot of the criteria is subjective.

Great leaders and effective managers continually demonstrate good judgment and make good marketing decisions.

They’re open minded, they listen well, and they make good decisions based on balanced insight, rather than conjecture or some ill-conceived notion of what’s worked in the past.

Many people who strive to be less judgmental in their personal lives still fall into the trap in their professional lives. It creeps into their hiring choices, their strategic planning, and their marketing plans.

Here’s a classic example that I’ve heard more than once: “Oh, I tried radio, and it doesn’t work.”

That particular business owner condemned an entire medium based on one lame attempt… he had a crummy story to tell, a poorly-written script, and a media schedule that was thinner than a supermodel on a new year’s resolution. Of course it didn’t work for him — that time.

I’ve heard other business owners complain that digital advertising doesn’t work. One look at their ads, and you can see why.

I’ve even run into CEOs who are completely biased when it comes to color. And I’m not talking about race. I’m talking about favorite colors and pet peeves like red, yellow or any shade of orange.

How rational is that?

Personal preferences and stereotypes creep into this business constantly. And stereotypes, based on judgmental conclusions at best, are not a helpful component of your marketing program.

In fact, poor judgment based on stereotypes or close-mindedness can ruin a small business.

At my firm we go to great lengths to get beyond the usual stereotypes, especially when it comes to the target audience.

One sentence on a creative brief cannot possibly sum up the feelings, attitudes and behaviors of a broad group of prospective customers.

On the creative side, we always try to develop intriguing stories with quirky, unexpected characters. (In Hollywood writing circles it’s common knowledge that most memorable heroes and villains are those that defy traditional stereotypes.)

Here are a few stereotypes from the marketing world that I’m familiar with. If you fall into this trap, you’ll have a very hard time making good decisions.

  1. CMOs can’t possibly be creative.
  2. Copywriters aren’t analytical enough for strategy work.
  3. Art directors don’t know a thing about business.
  4. Account planners can’t possibly contribute on the creative side.
  5. Anyone over 40 can’t be trusted to manage social media or digital advertising.

Nonsense. Great ideas can come from anywhere. Writers and art directors pick up a lot of business acumen by listening carefully to clients in a wide variety of business categories. And creativity is not something you lose as you get older.

Being judgmental is so common it’s listed as a personality type on Meyer’s Briggs Type Indicator tests. And it’s so ingrained in American culture you even hear it in post-game interviews… athletes who come in second openly admit that the winner was a “better person.”

No he isn’t. He just performed a little better that one time.

Unfortunately, we judge the quality of the person according to his or her performance. Ironically, we even judge ourselves for being too judgmental.

Blogs can be pretty judgmental.

The whole idea of an on-line soapbox lends itself to judgmental rants on just about any subject imaginable. I’ve written about the soapbox syndrome, and I’m working hard to make sure this blog doesn’t digress into a petty critique of the latest marketing blunder.

I urge you to do the same. Be open minded. Use good judgement and you’ll make good marketing decisions across the board.

good judgment and how to make good marketing decisions BN Branding

• Don’t let preconceived notions and stereotypes cloud your judgment when it comes to marketing programs.

• Don’t rush to judge someone based on their performance on one day, in one meeting, or on one project. Just because you didn’t like one idea, or one campaign concept, doesn’t mean the team is a failure. Good marketing decisions usually involve a lot of trial and error.

• Make sure you’ve done your homework — your research — before you dive into something. That’s a prerequisite for good judgement. If you’re trying to manage something that you know absolutely nothing about, it’s going to be hard to make wise decisions.

• Set aside your personal preferences when making decisions about creative execution. Even though you may not personally like orange doesn’t mean it should be eliminated entirely from the brand design guidelines. Even though you may not like the initial idea of this Nike ad doesn’t mean it’s not great advertising that’s going to resonate with the women you want.

• Remember that you are NOT the target audience. You know too much! You, as a marketing insider or business owner, can never see things in the same way a consumer sees it. But you have to at least try.

• Remember that your creative team is constantly judging  their own work against the best in the business.  And if they’re any good, they’re probably quite hard on themselves.

• And most of all, be open minded to new ideas. Don’t reinforce stereotypes, break them.

Click here for an unbiased, non-judgemental assessment of all your marketing efforts. 

Try this post if you want good judgement when it comes to website design. 

 

1 Just a little trim around the ears — How to cut your marketing budget without hurting your brand image.

BNBranding logoWhen it comes to belt tightening, most marketing managers have it all wrong. The minute the boss gives them the bad news… “gotta cut your marketing budget”  they go straight to the list of tactics and start chopping off the bottom of the spread sheet. Not a smart trimming around the ears, a military-style buzz cut…

how to cut your marketing budget

First thing to get chopped  is  community support… those feel-good event sponsorships that help non-profit organizations but don’t return any discernible ROI.

The next thing on the chopping block is ”image” advertising.” Anything that doesn’t have a coupon or a response vehicle of some kind is out the window.

Brand building, it seems, can wait for better days.

Quite often, the only thing left is nearly-free social media posts and tiny little digital display ads that don’t get seven seconds of attention.

The short-term reaction often leaves companies looking quite bad in the long run.

 

 

 

 

 

What’s needed is a more strategic approach to cutting your marketing budget.

Rather than a military barber’s approach to cost cutting, try thinking like a surgeon. First, do no harm. Start by eliminating the marketing messages that are off brand, off target, or both.

In order to do that, you might need a second opinion.

You need more than just the bosses’ orders and one person’s opinion to wisely cut your marketing budget. You need to eliminate dangerous assumptions from the marketing planning process and work with objective criteria of some sort.

So here’s an idea… why not start with an objective assessment of what you’re currently doing? Get a second opinion on your messaging, your media buy and your overall tactical plan.

waste in advertising - BNBranding's Brand Insight Blog

In my experience, it’s often the message, not the medium, that’s the problem…

Print ads say one thing, social media says another and the web site implies something else. Sales presentations go off in one direction, while promotions head somewhere else. Radio commercials, new media, good old-fashioned direct mail… it’s all scattered around with no coherent theme.

So before you do any budget cutting, use the opportunity to think about what you’re saying. Get your message aligned with your strategy. Reevaluate every marketing “touch point” in terms of consistency, clarity and brand worthiness. Then scalp all the wild hairs.

If you can just quit saying the wrong thing, you’ll save a ton of money.

Most marketing managers assume the budget was allocated in a logical manner to begin with. But that’s simply not the case. Most marketing budgets are handed down, year after year, and are based simply on “how we’ve always done it.”  No one ever questions the underlying assumptions.

And you know what they say about ass-umptions.

Here’s an example from the medical profession: Our client, the CEO of a multi-location pediatric practice, was enamored with the idea of “excellence.”  He wanted to build a “pediatric center of excellence” and recruit specialists from all over to “elevate the level of care to new heights.”  Operationally, that’s a great idea, but it was a terrible idea for advertising.

Because the assumption — that the quality of care is relevant to young mothers — turned out to be false. Moms believe that ALL doctors are good doctors. They just want one that they like in an office that’s convenient. So in that case, we started by cutting out all the communications that were focused on the quality of care.

Here’s another example of the messaging process gone wrong. I wrote a post about an ad for Wales Tourism. A classic case of paying a lot of money to place an ad  in Golf Digest that was wrong in both its strategy, and its execution.

As one British reader commented… “Golf Wales is an oxymoron.”  And even if you accept the strategy of selling Wales as a golf destination, the message was all wrong, so cutting that ad is probably the smartest thing they could do.

The fact is, Wales Tourism probably needs a lot more than just a quick trim. They need to rethink the entire hairdo. But who’s going to do that?

truth in advertising BNBrandingAny decent marketing person can buy media that will reach the desired target audience and choose tactics that will drive traffic. But revamping the strategy and nailing down that core brand message is something else entirely.

Strategy and message development are the hardest parts of the job, and unfortunately, many marketing managers aren’t up to the task. And even if they were, many bosses wouldn’t listen.

A well-crafted, comprehensive brand strategy book eliminates that problem and makes cost cutting a lot more logical. It’s like a brand bible that provides guidance and inspiration on every decision. So when push comes to shove, there’s no doubt about what should stay, and what should go.

That’s what my firm does… We help clients flesh-out their brand story and we put the strategy down on paper. Once it’s sold internally — and all the department heads are on the same page — then we help execute on it.

And by keeping that brand book close at hand, our clients eliminate waste and save money, without sacrificing their hard-earned brand  image.

So if you absolutely have to cut your marketing budget, start by reading this post.

BNBranding's Brand Insight Blog

6

Marketing for financial advisors – beyond gift baskets

BNBranding logoIt was one hell of a gift basket, piled high with a delicious assortment of treats… Not unusual for the holiday season, except it came from my financial advisor.

First gift ever from a planner who I’ve worked with for more than 10 years. Apparently, the stock market’s rise inspired her to do a little outreach. That’s one of the problems with marketing for financial advisors… it’s a fair weather affair.  (She stays conspicuously quiet when the market is tanking.)

Her marketing efforts are being driven by outside forces, beyond her control.

Unfortunately, her current clients see the effort for what it is. (Just buttering us up for the bad news to come.) And new prospects aren’t swayed because her personal brand isn’t strong enough to weather the whims of Wall Street.

Her brand has no differentiation and little visibility.

 

 

 

 

Here’s an example of the typical marketing for financial advisors…

marketing for financial advisors BNBranding • Monthly Chamber of Commerce breakfast meeting.

• Christmas card to all clients. (Gift baskets are typically reserved for only the top three or four clients.)

• One-page, off-the shelf website, never to be touched again once it’s up and running.

• Annual guest speaker luncheon. (Bring in a so-called “expert” spokesperson, book a room at a local hotel, cater lunch and then bore us to tears. If I wanted to know all that stuff, I’d do my own trading.)

It’s more of a tactical to-do list than an actual marketing plan. There’s no strategy at all.

In the past it might have worked… She could get by on her good looks and good news from a bull market. Not any more. There’s just too much competition on too many different fronts.

Compensation for independent financial advisors is typically based either on a flat fee, or on a percentage of the total assets under management (AUM). If it’s $100 million of other people’s money, they typically make 1% of that. A million bucks gross.

The problem is, when the market “corrects” itself, they might see a 30-40% drop in AUM, so they start scrambling to find new clients.

Choose one main thing BNBrandingMost just ratchet-up their networking efforts, hoping for more word-of-mouth. But it’s tough when they’ve been silent for years.

Some have discovered a new, more lucrative pipeline: Internet-based lead generation services.

Advisors sign up with an independent web directory and they pay only for highly qualified referrals. Very little effort for financial advisors. Very big ROI.

Independent, third-party directories also fill a vital role for consumers: They help simplify the search and match prospects with a financial advisor who fits.

It’s a vexing decision, choosing someone to handle your life savings. And most financial advisor web sites have the same, stock-photo look, and the same brochure-style copy.

Very, very few have any sort of differentiation or market niche.

On-line directories have been done successfully in the education market, travel, real estate,  and the auto industry. So why not financial advisors?

When prospects go on line to research “financial advisors” they begin with Google. But Google can’t sort or organize the category in a helpful way. That’s where directories come in…  they categorize advisors, provide details on specific services and nudge prospects along in the decision making process.

So assuming that you have some sort of specialty or differentiating features, you can get a steady stream of very qualified leads and search engine optimization you could never achieve on your own.

In this day and age, marketing for financial advisors has to go beyond a static website and a Facebook page.

If you really are an expert financial planner, share your knowledge and your unique insight by writing a blog. Establish a presence for you and your personal brand in places where your direct competitors aren’t.

Do something, ANYTHING, that’s different from what you’ve always done.

Most professionals who run small service businesses believe  networking is enough. But that’s not the case right now for financial advisors. There’s no gift basket big enough for the job ahead. It’s time to start employing some new marketing tactics.

But before you dive in, consider your strategy. Because tactics without a strategy is like a ship with no rudder. For more on Strategy vs. Tactics, try this post.

If you want an idea that will dramatically differentiate you from all the other hungry financial advisors and help you retain clients without the use of lavish gifts, send me an e-mail: johnf@bnbranding.com.

For more info, try this post.

BNBranding's Brand Insight Blog

 

1 a bend oregon branding firm

Marketing lessons from all that annoying political advertising of 2020

brand credibility from branding expertsI’m sure you’re all relieved that the political ads of 2020 are behind us. From a creative standpoint it’s rare to find any political ads that are noteworthy. As a genre, they all suck. But if you can get past the half-truths and the cookie-cutter format you just might find some good marketing lessons from political advertising that you can apply to your business.

In the 2020 election one ad busted through all the rhetoric and made an impact on the advertising community. There’s a lot to learn from this spot, regardless of where you stand politically. Business owners should pay attention, because this is probably the best political ad I’ve ever seen:

 

Here are some of the marketing lessons from this race, and from this political ad, that you can apply to your own business:

First, you have to know the playing field.

That’s the basis for any good marketing strategy. Very few incumbent presidents in the history of this country have been voted out of office. This election was Trump’s to lose, and the Biden camp had to approach it from that perspective. It was going to be hard to win, so they had to help Trump lose it. And that TV spot fits the bill.

The “Silence Him” spot is a dramatic and accurate reflection of the marketing strategy.

Sometimes the best strategy is to just shut up. Biden’s strategy, all along, was to just let Donald Trump do the talking… the more Trump talked, the better Biden looked.

The “silence him”  spot captures that foot-in-the-mouth strategy in a brilliantly simple manner, and it seems to have resonated.

But in business you can’t count on your competitors to make high-profile mistakes. That would be an unlikely gift. So your strategy needs to revolve around authentic benefits of your own, rather than waiting for your competitors to shoot themselves in the foot.

Stay on message. 

COVID 19 was the big, game-changing issue of this election, and this spot drives that issue home in a painfully obvious way. It reminds people about the handling of a pandemic, without dwelling on the horrible reality of it.

 

 

Let others do the talking for you, whenever possible.

If you can get a third party talking up your brand, it’s much more effective than talking about yourself. That’s why testimonials, endorsements and reviews work so well. And if you can get your direct competitor to do the talking for you, that’s  better yet!

Earned media is more valuable than paid.

Paid ads are written off as propaganda, while press coverage of any kind is seen as somewhat credible. If you own a business and you’re not doing any kind of PR outreach, you’re missing the boat. There are many ways to get affordable online coverage these days, and it can do wonders for your online presence and SEO, if nothing else.

Don’t go on the attack unless you’re the underdog.

A big name candidate attacking a no-name, first-time challenger just doesn’t play well, especially in little local races. If you’re the established brand in your niche, you need to behave like a polished, professional leader. You need to show some honest accomplishments in your ads, instead of just bashing the little guy.

Trump’s continued attacks on Biden didn’t sway voters, perhaps because few people believed that moderate Joe is, actually, a closet communist. If you’re going to run comparison ads, you better have the truth on your side. More on comparison ads

Use the facts to your advantage.

The “Silence Him” spot is factual… it used well-know quotes that came directly out of Donald Trump’s mouth. The Biden team could have chosen an even more damning collection of off-color quotes, but they chose to stick with those that referred to the #1 issue — the pandemic. When the facts are stranger than fiction, use them!

marketing lessons from political advertising - BN BrandingIt’s the idea, stupid.

The Silence Him spot proves you don’t need a massive production budget to convey a compelling message that will move the needle for your business.

It’s not about Hollywood lights and a cast of big name actors, it’s the idea that counts. Simpler the better.

Transforming Trump’s mouth into a ballot dot was brilliant. And using simple animation made it even more arresting.

Demonstrate what you want people to do.

In this case the Biden ad demonstrates exactly what every political ad aims to accomplish… a vote for a particular candidate. Just mark your ballot a certain way.

(At some point, it looks like the campaign team decided to add the bit that demonstrates someone dropping the ballot in the drop box, just to be sure people understood that little detail. It was an obvious afterthought. The spot would have been more powerful without that.)

When you’re buying advertising, a good marketing mix is still important.

Omni channel media buying is the best way to get results. Political candidates still rely heavily on TV advertising, but they’re also devoting huge budgets to all the various digital channels, as well as radio and outdoor. You have to cover all the bases, or at least more than just one little social media channel.

Presidential elections are a good time to turn off your ad campaign.

All the stations, outlets and channels raise their rates when political campaigns start ramping up. Plus, the volume of noise is so deafening, it’s hard to get your message across. So you’re paying a premium for less visibility and lower click through rates.

Attack Ads  — Most political advertising takes a negative approach.

It’s proven that in politics the fear of loss has more persuasive power than the hope of any gains. And in this general election it proved out on both sides of the political spectrum. Everyone believed they have a lot to lose, so we set new records for voter turnout.

However, negativity did not win the day in 2020. Biden’s campaign was unusually positive. Only 10% of his ads were attack ads. Trump’s campaign was simply too angry, negative and alarmist to be effective  — a second time.

A negative approach can work in business, but it’s much more complicated. It’s more like running against a dozen like-minded politicians in a primary race. There are many options, so you have to be careful about who or what you choose to attack. More on Fear of Loss in advertising) 

The stakes are much higher in politics than in business.

In a general election it’s a no-holds-barred sprint to the finish every time. Winner takes all. In business it’s a never-ending marathon. You can often cruise along quite nicely with just tiny gains in market share. So pace yourself, but keep making progress. Consistency is what counts. Stopping is what kills you.

honesty in political advertisingHyper-specific messaging helps.

Political operatives are very good at matching the message with the market. Campaigns spend a ton of time and money sifting through the data to identify supporters, find out how they feel about the candidate, and how likely they are to actually vote. They segment audiences very carefully, and employ different language, different images, different music for every individual segment of the population.

The Biden team did another version of the “Silence Him” ad that focused on climate change. (They served that one up to younger audiences.) So don’t just use one generic ad to blast across many different segments in your digital advertising. Get focused. Slice and dice.

It’s NOT all about you. 

In the 2020 race Biden, himself, often took the back seat to the various coalitions he pulled together. In fact, many Democrats were worried that he wasn’t doing enough. He was too quiet. Too modest. But his relatively low-key approach was perfectly on brand for Biden. He was never going to out-shout Trump, so wisely, he never even tried.

Tone matters. 

To me, most political ads are annoying because they sound overly negative. Dramatic voice-overs are commonly accompanied by ominous music and dark, foreboding images. Like the unseen serial killer in horror movies… always lurking.

The “Silence Him” spots didn’t need any of that. The sound of Trump’s voice, his words, and the simple, animated visual approach was much more effective. Instead of fictional fear mongering they used a matter-of-fact approach that came off as actually a bit hopeful… 75 million people were hoping he’d be silenced. Like it or not, now he is.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

improve your marketing don't be scared

Need to improve your marketing? Start with your P.O.V.

How you see things — your unique point-of-view — skews everything you do. You can’t escape it. Whether you need to launch an ad campaign, build a brand, make a video, or improve your marketing overall, your P.O.V. can make all the difference.

improve your marketing don't be scared In Hollywood “POV” is a common technique used by directors to add tension to a scene. Picture the POV of the ax murderer stalking his next victim in a classic horror movie.

The audience sees only what the character sees. It’s also called subjective perspective — as opposed the objective, third-person perspective in most movie scenes.

Marketers and business owners often get stuck in their own, subjective perspective trap. They’re too far inside the bottle to be objective when it comes to marketing issues.

Way back in 1960 Theodore Levitt coined the phrase “marketing myopia.”  In a famous Harvard Business Review article he said that short-sighted executives who are missing the big picture will fail to see new opportunities and/or new threats.

He cites the railroad industry as a good example. I would add Blockbuster video and Skype to the list of businesses that took their eyes off the ball.

Levitt encouraged executives to shift their focus from an inward-facing operations orientation to an outward facing consumer orientation.

In other words, don’t get stuck in a scary  movie. Sometimes you have to pull back like a fisheye lens and open your eyes to new, customer-first viewpoints.

“People don’t want a quarter-inch drill, they want a quarter-inch hole,” Levitt said.

 

 

 

 

The lack of a clear P.O.V. spells trouble for brands.

Many start-ups these days are built — like Tom’s shoes — around a purpose of some kind. Kudos to them for owning a definitive P.O.V. from the start!

But there many more business owners who duck and cover when it comes to taking a stand of any kind, on any issue.

They sheepishly say, “well, we don’t want to offend anyone.” (As if everyone is a prospect.) They won’t even entertain a back-door approach to their advertising. “Don’t focus on the problem, just talk about our product!”

Most of those who are trying to be all things to all people will fail to win brand loyalty. People don’t get passionate about wishy-washy brands.

 

improve your marketing perspective from BN Branding

 

All iconic brands have well-defined POVs. They take a stand — on something!

Patagonia has always had a very clear, authentic POV when it comes to the climbing community.

In the last decade, they’ve chosen to take on much bigger issues, as well. Patagonia’s stance on climate change is a natural extension of the products they’ve made, the markets they’ve always served, and the founder’s POV of the world.

Patagonia already had deep, meaningful connections with millions of customers, and that political stance just helped cement the relationship even further.

When it comes to branding, polarization can be a good thing. No one gets passionate about wishy-washy brands, so it’s better to be annoying to some, than invisible to all.

 

It doesn’t have to be a universally loved P.O.V. to help improve your marketing.

Chick-fil-A promotes a political POV that many find disagreeable, to say the least. And yet it’s the fastest growing food chain in the world.

The average Chick-fil-A location brings in 10 times more revenue than a Subway franchise. More than 30,000 people a year apply for Chick-fil-A franchises, even though it offers no actual ownership at all.

They don’t care if it’s UN popular to a large segment of the population. It’s insanely popular with another group that’s big enough.

The golf club brand PXG chooses to bring an obnoxiously superior point-of-view to everything they do.

Their claims are boisterous and unbelievable, but that’s the PXG brand. People either love it or they hate it. There’s no in between. It works with a certain segment of the market precisely because it’s strong and obnoxious.

 

improve your marketing - be seen BN Branding

Sometimes the problem is rose-colored glasses…

Some cocky business owners and sales leaders go through life with an unrealistic, overly optimistic point-of-view.

They’re absolutely, positively, 100% certain that they “know their customers.”

They’re on top of every new development in the market.

Everyone who’s a prospect knows all about them.

And, of course, their product beats every other product.

Everything’s just peachy!

Hopefully that’s your competitor, because those are the guys you can sneak up on in broad daylight. That rose colored point-of-view makes them a juicy target for new competition from all different directions. They’ll never see it coming.

 

In other cases  — I’ve seen this a thousand times — one person’s overbearing perspective becomes a roadblock to progress.

Every year he vows to do something different to improve his marketing, but he approaches the task from the same old skewed point-of-view. And that perspective is just pain wrong.

You have to change your mind before you’ll ever change behavior. Sometimes the mental change of is the hardest part.

So the first step toward dramatic marketing improvement is seeing your lack of perspective for what it is; A hinderance of human nature.

Humans hold on tightly to what we think we already know.

If you want to improve your marketing, avoid the myopic “me, me, me” P.O.V.

This is one of the most common mistakes in marketing and advertising: The business owner or marketer puts her point-of-view ahead of the audience’s point-of-view.

It’s an inside-the-bottle perspective that revolves around business goals, egos and operational realities rather than what’s in it for the audience.

That’s marketing myopia.

Even the biggest brand fall prey to it. There was a period of time, in the mid 80’s, when Nike lost its way and became too inwardly focused.  Then Jim Riswold at Weiden & Kennedy came up with “Just Do It.” It was a turning point for Nike.

Keep this in mind… here’s the reality:

Prospects won’t buy unless they can first imagine themselves using your product or service.  In their fist-person P.O.V.

That’s the single most important perspective to consider.

So you have to step aside for a second. Shut up! Quit talking about what you can offer and listen to what they really want, need and desire.

That’s how you can start seeing things through a different lens. And that’s how you can improve your marketing across the board.

Need help with that? Call me. 5541-815-0075

 

 

 

8 ski industry case study from BNBranding

Ski Industry Marketing — New product launch vs. the birth of a brand

ski industry case study from BNBranding

The author, enjoying freshies. Head skis with Knee Bindings.

bn branding's iconic logoIt was the kind of day ski bums live for…  11 inches of new snow, 18 degrees, calm winds. And the sky was clearing.

The experts were queued up before the first lift, chomping at the bit for fresh tracks. But for intermediate skiers accustomed to the forgiving comfort of groomed corduroy, it posed a bit of a problem. See, all 10 inches fell in the early morning hours — after the grooming machines had manicured the mountain.

There would be no “groomers” that morning.

These are the days that ski industry marketing revolves around. However, a lot of people struggle in unpacked snow. So once the hounds had tracked up the runs and moved on, into the trees, the masses were left to flail around in cut-up powder on top of an icy base.

There were a lot of yard sales that day — tumbling falls where skis, poles and goggles were strewn all over the run. One guy I know broke a rib. Some snowboarders had broken wrists. And there were plenty of knee injuries.

Always are. Any ski patrolman will tell you it’s knees and wrists.

 

 

 

 

Ski industry marketing case study featuring KneeBinding – the brain child of John Springer-Miller of Stowe Vermont.

Modern ski binding technology has almost eliminated the broken leg from skiing. Helmets have reduced the number of head injuries, but knee injuries are common. Scary common. In the U.S. 70,000 people blow out their ACL skiing every year. On the World Cup circuit, you rarely find a racer who hasn’t had some damage to an ACL.

But now there’s a new binding brand that aims to put the knee surgeons and physical therapists out of business.

While all modern bindings release up and down at the heel, KneeBinding also releases laterally. The product’s patented “PureLateral Heel Release” is a huge technological leap in binding technology and, seemingly, a slam dunk in ski industry marketing.

In fact, it’s the first substantial change in 30 years and it promises a dramatic decrease in the number of knee injuries on the slopes.

They really can save your ACL in the most common, twisting, rearward falls. And they don’t release prematurely. (At least from what I can tell from the current reviews and my own, personal experience.)

BNBranding how to choose the right message for your ads

KneeBinding has the potential to blow the ski socks off the ski industry. But will it?

If the company’s early advertising is any indication, they don’t have a very good handle on their brand strategy. This may, very well, be a ski industry case study of an under-achieving company.

Springer-Miller has been quoted saying, “This is a serious company with a serious solution to a very serious problem.”

And it’s true: It now costs an average of $18,000 for the initial  repair of a torn ACL.  That makes ACL injuries in skiing a $1 billion-a-year medical problem.  Plus, it takes eight months, usually with intensive physical therapy, for an ACL to heal well enough for the victim to get back on the slopes. One-out-of-five never skis again.

So why, pray tell, would you launch KneeBinding with goofy ads featuring a pair of 3-glasses? “Just tear them out, put ‘em on, and see the world’s first 3-D binding.”

I get it.  The idea of 3-D Bindings might have merit, but 3-D glasses? C’mon. It’s a gimmicky idea that will, unfortunately, rub off on the product. And the last thing you want is people thinking KneeBinding is just another ski industry gimmick.

It was an unfortunate move for a potentially great brand. And frankly, a failure in the annuls of  ski industry marketing.

The tagline/elevator pitch is also problematic: “The only binding in the world that can mitigate knee injuries.”

That line was obviously written by an engineer. Red flag!

First, it’s absolutely untrue: All modern bindings mitigate knee injuries to some degree. If we couldn’t blow out of our bindings there’d be a hundred times the number of ACL injuries. Plus a lot of broken bones.

Granted, the KneeBinding mitigates a specific type of knee injury that the competitors don’t, but that line just doesn’t ring true. It sets off my internal BS meter and puts the credibility of the entire brand in question.

ski industry case study marketing

Besides, it sounds like

something an M.D. would say. Not exactly the stuff of a memorable, iconic brand.

KneeBinding is a perfect example of a company that’s led by an engineer/inventor. Springer-Miller has developed a great product, and hats off to him for that.  But the brand will never become a household name if the marketing is also driven by the engineers. (Is Too much information killing your adveritisng?) 

Even the name is a marketing nightmare. It’s so literal it excludes the most important segment of the market.

“Knee Binding” won’t appeal to fearless, indestructible 20-year olds who star in the ski films and drive the industry trends. It’s for the parents of those kids. The 40+ crowd who have been skiing long enough to see a lot of their friends on crutches.

That group — my peers — will buy the KneeBinding to avoid injury and maintain our misguided idea of youth. And we might buy them for our kids, as well. But that’s not the market Springer-Miller needs if he wants to build a lasting brand in the ski industry.

And guess what… KneeBinding won’t appeal to either audience with technical illustrations of the binding’s components, or with 3-D glasses, like they have in their current advertising.

It has to be way more emotional than that.

Not just the advertising, the brand itself. It needs a hook that goes way beyond engineering and orthopedics. (Three logical reasons why brands need more emotion.) 

I hope this product succeeds. I really do. I hope the KneeBinding technology becomes the industry standard. But I fear that the company and the current brand will not survive unless they get a handle on their brand strategy and their marketing program.

Launching a great product does not always equate to the birth of a lasting brand. KneeBinding needs to build a foundation for the brand that’s as good as the product itself. Right now, the quality of the marketing is not even close.

With the right marketing help and adequate capital, KneeBinding could thrive. (But It’ll never give the major manufacturers a run for their money unless one of the big brands licenses the technology.)

Knee Binding was first in the market, which is big. They’ve won some industry accolades. The product stands up to performance tests. And they’ve established some degree of national distribution.

But this is not the first time someone has tried lateral heel release, and the older target audience remembers those failed attempts. The younger crowd doesn’t think they need it.

Plus, bindings have been a commodity product for the last 20 years. They’re not even on the radar of most skiing consumers. And Knee Bindings are the most expensive bindings on the market…. Not a good combination for ski industry marketing success.

How John Springer-Miller address all those issues could mean the difference between a safe, successful run and a ski  industry marketing face plant.

Small-Business Management 2020 — Unusual times require an unreasonable approach.

brand credibility from branding expertsYou’ve heard this pessimistic preamble a thousand times by now… “In these unprecedented times…  Blah blah blah.”  And you’ve probably seen the memes that categorize 2020 as spoiled lutefisk on moldy toast, and other equally stinky analogies.

It’s sad that so many businesses choose to lead with that line of thinking. But it is understandable. Times ARE tough, and it’s natural to be afraid. But when it comes to small-business management, pessimism seldom plays well.

This viral turn of events that we’re all experiencing doesn’t spell doom for most businesses. Despite the pandemic, most owners, managers and entrepreneurs are finding ways to adapt and survive. We look for silver linings, no matter how small, and we shift our thinking in ways that help us cope.

small-business management BN BrandingIn American culture that means moving forward. Making progress. Anything but a stand-still!

There’s a very interesting quote from George Bernard Shaw that’s relevant to small-business management these days:

“The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”

On the surface, this makes no sense. You can’t change the world to fit your whim. Right?

Wrong. We can change our own, little worlds.

 

 

Entrepreneurs do it all that time. They start businesses that are built on that very goal, and that higher level of purpose is what propels them past big bumps in the road — like this pandemic.

In small-business management, purpose paves the way to progress.

The reasonable person would say, “I don’t have any control over this COVID thing, so I’m just going to play the cards I’m dealt, hunker down, and hope for the best.”

The unreasonable person says, “What can I make of this horrible situation? How can I change the world in some little way that aligns with the core of my being and produces some financial return? ”

A lot of smart, reasonable, people are wasting their time analyzing the COVID statistics, dwelling on the scope of the problem and worrying about the lack of any clear path out of this mess.

They’re reasonable, but stuck.

Progress depends on unreasonable people… The visionaries who flip the script. The dreamers who choose not to accept fear, constraints, and outside circumstances at an excuse for inaction.

Action is the antidote to despair.

Being UNreasonable in this situation doesn’t mean you dispense with common sense and good decision making. It means you get outta your head, and into action. It means embracing the uncertainty, and pushing forward anyway.

This is definitely not “business as usual” for anyone. It’s unusual, uncomfortable, and unpleasant, but it doesn’t have to be your undoing.

Let’s play a little word game: Think about all the negative, UN words you can apply here, and start editing them out of your vocabulary — and out of your business operations.

Unhappy. Make it your personal quest to make sure your people are happy, even if you have to cut their hours back. That means making sure they’re learning, growing and progressing. It’s not just about the money.

Unfocused. Use this opportunity to re-focus your marketing efforts around a sound business strategy. Streamline your offerings. Narrow your niche. Pivot if you have to. That’s small-business management in a nutshell.

Unclear. Clarity should be lesson #1 in small business management:  Clarity should be a priority in your marketing communications, in your presentations, and in your personal correspondence. It’s one of the simplest little changes that you can make, and it pays off handsomely. Just take time to be more mindful about how you communicate.

new approach to website designUnassuming.  I’m always amazed by how many successful entrepreneurs are terrible self-promoters. They’re so humble, and focused on doing their specialized work, they don’t see their true value in the marketplace. So they fly under the radar and continually underachieve.

Unaware. In small-business management, awareness is the first step toward progress. A business interruption can be a great opportunity to actually stop and look at the big picture. Reevaluate your efforts. Be more aware of what’s going on, inside and outside of your immediate little world. Do some strategic listening and you just might see a clear answer to your problem.

Uninspired.  Inspiration may be hard to come by right now. If that’s the case, keep reading the Brand Insight Blog. Hire us to infuse some new thinking into your operation. Or better yet, schedule a retreat to Bend, Oregon for a nice, safe change of scenery and a huge dose of branding inspiration.

No one is unaffected by the pandemic, but you can choose to be undeterred by it.

You can be unflappable. You can be undeniably determined to succeed, regardless of what’s going on.

So start being unreasonable for a change. You might be surprised how much progress you can make. An if you need a creative kick in the pants, call us!

 

a new approach to website design BNBranding