Tag Archives for " strategic planning "

7 a bend oregon branding firm

Put some meat in your marketing messages.

BNBranding logoEvery year, millions of dollars are wasted on advertising that is glizty and well-produced, but not very well thought-out. Like the stereotypical supermodel… nice to look at, but there’s just no substance there.

A few years ago I was talking with a restauranteur about this very subject. He had retained an ad agency to help promote his launch. They produced a website, some digital ads, a radio advertising campaign, some social media posts and a slogan.

They did all that without having a single, meaningful conversation with him about his business. If they had, they would have realized that this particular business owner didn’t understand his own brand.

a bend oregon branding firmHe had an exquisite restaurant in a perfect location with an impressive interior and outstanding cuisine, but he had no story to tell. No clear idea of what his core message ought to be or who his audience was.

In other words, he was missing a clearly communicated value proposition.

Unfortunately, his ad agency was relying on him for the brand strategy, so what he ended up with was a campaign that he admitted “doesn’t really fit this place.”

He and I did more quality thinking over coffee than he had ever done with his ad agency. After our conversation he was convinced he needed to start all over.

It was an expensive lesson, and an all-too-common false start with his ad agency.

He should have hired someone to help him define his brand strategy before diving into an ad campaign. Before he paid a top-name architect to design the restaurant. Before he ever trained his servers or developed the menu, he should have known what his establishment was “all about.”

That’s the difference between a strategic branding company and most small ad agencies. Branding starts earlier — further “upstream” — and  goes deeper. It touches all facets of the business, not just the outbound advertising messages. It goes beyond the sizzle to the meat of the business.

That particular business owner was not unique. A recent article in the Harvard Business Review shows that the majority of VP and C-level execs don’t know their company’s strategy. Or at least they can’t verbalize it without launching into long-winded corporate mumbo-jumbo.

Companies that DO have a clear sense of their marketing strategy have a huge leg-up on the competition.

Little branding bend oregon brand strategyCaesar’s is a classic example. Their brand strategy was simple: Sell value and compete with Dominoes on price. How? Sell two-for-one pizzas, to be exact.

That was the strategy they took to their ad agency, and it was spelled out quite nicely: “Two great pizzas for one low price.” Then the creative folks at Cliff Freeman & Partners figured out how to communicate that simple strategy in a provocative way:

“PizzaPizza.”

 If you’re old enough, I’m sure you can still hear that quirky voice in your head. The chain used that line for almost 20 years, and then went back to it in 2012. The tagline actually outlived the promotion… they’re not offering the two-fer deal any more, but the line still works.

According to Ad Age, “They’ve been able to grow the brand with a price point that was affordable option for most Americans… They really stand for value more than any other brand. A recent Sandelman & Associates survey rated Little Caesars the best value for the money.”

That’s their story, and they’re sticking with it.

The benefits of a clearly defined and well-written marketing strategy are clear: You won’t run pretty ads in the wrong publications or on the wrong websites. You won’t change directions every year, just to be fashionable. And you won’t have digital advertising effort that doesn’t jive with the rest of your branding.

Bottom line… you’ll be more focused and efficient in everything you do.

But how do you get there? In most small ad agencies strategy is not a deliverable. Account executives do it by the seat of the pants based on information provided by the client, and on gut instinct. Then they’ll just jump right into the sexiest part of the project… the creative execution.

bend branding firm bend ad agencyThat fits with the prevailing perception: Most business people think of strategic planning as a left-brained activity, but ad agencies are enclaves of right-brained, creative thinking. Therefore, you can’t possibly get a brand strategy from them.

Right???

Traditional thinking also says you need a consulting firm for strategy.

What’s more helpful is a sensible combination of both services from one team: Strategic insight and disciplined execution. A left-brain, right-brain, one-two punch. That’s how my firm approaches it… insight first, THEN execution.

No amount of creative wizardry will save a marketing campaign that lacks a strong, well-defined sales premise. That’s why we put so much emphasis on message development and front-end strategic issues.

Setting aside time for some productive strategic thinking is the most valuable thing you can do for your business. And it’s not about spreadsheets, it’s about story telling.

Chances are, you’ll need help. You’re too close to the situation. Too consumed by the quarterly numbers. Or just too darn busy.

So find someone you trust. Block out a day, get out of your office, and think it through with your most trusted advisors. Look at everything you’re doing, and ask yourself this: what is this company really all about? What’s the message of substance behind your marketing? Is your brand all beauty and no brains?

BTW… That restaurant I referred to in the beginning of this post has since gone out of business.

Need help pinpointing your brand story? Shoot me an email or a LinkedIn Message. John Furgurson. Johnf@bnbranding.com.

Advertising strategy from BNBranding

 

 

 

Want more info on brand strategy and strategic message development? Try this post.

saying no in business

Just say “NO.” How to build your business by bowing out gracefully.

BNBranding logoSaying no in business is one of the most difficult yet liberating things you can do. You might want to practice at home, with your kids.

The most effective managers and executives say no a lot.

For instance, they politely decline to pursue business that doesn’t fit their strategic objectives. They say no to employees who try to hijack their time. They don’t tolerate overblown financial projections and long, drawn-out presentations. They say no to new initiatives that don’t fit the brand or the corporate culture.

They even say no to their bosses and to their best clients sometimes.

The typical small-business owner, on the other hand, says yes, yes, yes to anything that comes along. Turning down work is just not part of the program. So in an effort to grow the business and put food on the table, they make a habit of appeasing people. 

Say no to build your business BNBranding“Sure, we can do that.”  Yes, we can do that too.”

It’s a particularly common problem in professional service firms. Because after all, it IS a service business. We serve our clients. We aim to please.

An overly agreeable approach isn’t just a lack of courage. It’s often symptomatic of two glaring managerial shortcomings: little or no strategic thinking and a brand that’s not very focused or well defined.

Defining a Brand Strategy means choosing a specialty, setting specific goals, and turning away business that doesn’t fit with your core brand values. If you don’t say no in business, you’ll never have an iconic brand.

The clarity that comes from a well-defined, well written brand strategy makes it much easier to say no when you really need to.

When Steve Jobs returned to Apple in 1997 the company was, in his own words, “in deep shit.” They had at least 13 new initiatives and product ideas but no direction. No strategic focus. No “gravitational pull,” as he put it.

Jobs killed all but two of the initiatives. One was the iMac and the other was the G4. By saying no, he set the company in a specific, definable direction that’s still paying off today.

BNBranding's brand insight blog“Companies sometimes forget who they are.” Jobs once said. “Fortunately, we woke up. And now we’re on a really good track. It comes from saying no to 1,000 things to make sure we don’t get on the wrong track or try to do too much. We’re always thinking about new markets we could enter, but it’s only by saying no that you can concentrate on the things that are really important.” *

Say no in business to 1,000 things — in order to get one thing really right.

Peter Drucker believes the only people who truly get anything done are monomaniacs – people who are intensely focused on one thing at a time. “The more you take on, the greater chance you will lose effectiveness in all aspects of your life.”

Best-selling author Ken Blanchard, (The One-Minute Manager, Gung Ho) says without clear goals you will quickly be a victim of too many commitments. “You will have no framework in which to make decisions about where you should or shouldn’t focus your energy.”

So I guess modern day multi-tasking isn’t the shortest route to success.

Mahatma Gandhi said, “A ‘no’ uttered from deepest conviction is better and greater than a ‘yes’ merely uttered to please, or what is worse, to avoid trouble.”

As a Creative Director I say no a lot. Clients often make impossible requests at the 11th hour or float their own “creative” ideas in early strategy meetings. Sometimes, I swear, they’re just trying to get a rise outta me. Deep down they know their ideas are lame, but they want to see how I handle it.

Here are some good things that come from saying no in business:

• You have more opportunities to say yes to the right customers, at the right time. You can pick your battles. 

• You have more time to focus on more important tasks, like long-term planning, strategic thinking and branding.

• Your operation will become more streamlined and efficient. 

• You’ll have a better sense of balance in life — between work, home and play.

• Saying “no” expresses how you really feel. You’re not hiding anything, and you’re taking responsibility for your own feelings. It’s more authentic than a forced “yes.” 

• Saying no actually increases your value in the market niche you’ve choosen.

truth in advertising BNBranding

At BNBranding one of the goals of our new business development effort is to say no more often. And not just to accounts that are too small, but also to businesses owners, marketing managers and entrepreneurs who might pay well, but don’t share our core values.

As the old saying goes, “values mean nothing in business until they cost you money.”

We need more work, but not just any work. Work that we’re proud to show off.

We need clients, but not just any clients. We need clients who we’re genuinely happy to help, and are honestly grateful for it.

Fast Company magazine ran a great article about Jim Wier, the CEO of Snapper lawn mowers. He said no in business. In fact, he said no to Walmart and gave up tens of millions of dollars in annual sales with one visit to Arkansas. But he was adamant that selling Snapper mowers through Walmart stores was incompatible with their strategy and their brand.

Now that’s courage. And focus.

Most large companies with a well-respected brand like Snapper would be tempted to launch a line extension strategy to accommodate Walmart. Just produce a cheaper mower overseas and slap the Snapper name on it. But Wier knew that would just dilute the brand and confuse people.

saying no in businessLike when Subway recently announced they’d be test marketing pizzas. How does that fit with their “eat fresh” healthy fast food strategy? Can you see Jared, the Subway spokesperson, losing 60 pounds while eating pizza?  I don’t think so.

Someone should have stepped up and said no to that idea.

For more on establishing a clear brand strategy, try this post.

If you need some help establishing a clear marketing strategy, and executing it, give us a call. We might say no, but we might not. 541-815-0075.

* The Steve Jobs story is from “The Perfect Pitcth” by Jon Steele.  BNBranding  branding services, advertising agency marketing management. in Bend, Oregon.

BNBranding's Brand Insight Blog